Museum blog

Read our blog to get the lowdown from our experts and go behind the scenes at the Royal Observatory, Cutty Sark, National Maritime Museum, Caird Library and the Queen's House.

9 September 2016

As we prepare for the reopening of the Queen's House, Katy Barrett, Curator of Art, looks at the dramatic effect the house has had on Greenwich. 

9 September 2016

As well as being objects of beauty, the astrolabe was the instrument favoured for instruction and observation in celestial astronomy for more than a millennium. We hear more from Christopher Parkin, Museum of the History of Science, University of Oxford.

8 September 2016

Helen Johnston has been following the work of the Greenwich Foreshore Recording and Observation Group, on the foreshore by the site of the lost Tudor royal Greenwich Palace.

6 September 2016

The crew of Cutty Sark had their share of illnesses and accidents. Captain Moore had a medical chest with a range of the most likely medicines needed to treat common ailments and a medical book to help him diagnose illnesses and their treatments. 

6 September 2016

Poor records mean the valuable contribution of Asian crew members to Britain's mercantile fleet have often remained hidden. However new crew lists found in our archives promise huge potential for future research. 

5 September 2016

On Saturday 10 September we will be opening up the ship model stores at No.1 Smithery, The Historic Dockyard Chatham.

2 September 2016

Hassan Mahamdallie, Director of the Muslim Institute, considers recent archival finds uncovering the stories of men and women from black and Asian people in Britain, including 2000 photographic records of Bangladeshi ships’ cooks in the archives of the National Maritime Museum.

2 September 2016

What happened on board Cutty Sark while the ship was in port? To answer that question, Cutty Sark Volunteer Roger Hodge looked into Captain Moore’s personal logbook from 1882, when Cutty Sark was on her thirteenth voyage. The log covers the weeks spent at sea, as well as the time the ship was in port, thus giving us an insight into the daily life of the crew, handling of cargos, illnesses on board and the manner in which trade was conducted in far off lands.

2 September 2016

In our sixth and final knots blog we will show you how to tie the Stevedore. Sometimes referred to as the Figure Nine Knot, the Stevedore is a stopper knot which doesn’t jam and is perfect for heavy loads. 

2 September 2016

The secret love letters of Nelson and Emma Hamilton, though it appears his capabilities at subterfuge were not nearly as great as those he possessed for naval leadership!

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