The runner-up image for the Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2010 competition.

This is the Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition category for under-16s.

The Moon is a wonderful object to photograph if you’re just starting out in astrophotography, with constant changes of view throughout the lunar cycle. Find out more about How to photograph the Moon

The easiest way to capture star trails, another popular category with our young astrophotographers, is to take one long exposure, of at least 30 minutes. Find out more about How to photograph star trails.

Runner-up: Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2010

The Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year runner-up was 13-year-old Laurent V. Joli-Coeur (Canada). Laurent’s ‘Solar Halo’ photo, taken with a Canon Digital Rebel DSLR camera, shows sunlight reflecting from tiny ice crystals in very high clouds, giving rise to a colourful solar halo. Two vapour trails from passing aircraft cast shadows on the higher clouds above due to the low angle of the Sun.

I was in my family's car on our way to New York City when I saw a beautiful solar halo through the roof,’ said Laurent. ‘I happened to have my mother's camera in hands so I tried my best to capture the beautiful scene in all its glory.’

Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition

The Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition is an annual global search for the most beautiful and spectacular visions of the cosmos by amateur and professional astrophotographers. The winning images are showcased in a stunning exhibition at the Royal Observatory Greenwich. 

Visit the IAPY 2015 exhibition