The winning image for the Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2011 competition.

This is the Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition category for under-16s.

The Moon is a wonderful object to photograph if you’re just starting out in astrophotography, with constant changes of view throughout the lunar cycle. Find out more about How to photograph the Moon

The easiest way to capture star trails, another popular category with our young astrophotographers, is to take one long exposure, of at least 30 minutes. Find out more about How to photograph star trails.

Winner: Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2011

The winning shot for the Young Astronomy Photographer category for 2011 was ‘Lunar Eclipse and Occultation’ by 15-year-old Jathin Premjith (India). The image was taken using a Celestron CPC800 203.3mm (8-inch) Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope and a Canon 5D Mark II DSLR camera, and skilfully captures both a lunar eclipse and a second fleeting astronomical event, the moment a star appears from behind the orbiting Moon.

Judge Rebekah Higgitt said of the photo: ‘The colour of the eclipsed moon, reflecting the red of sunsets all over Earth, is both delicately beautiful and truly majestic. The photographer has also captured just the right moment, with a bright but tiny star close to occultation.’

Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition

The Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition is an annual global search for the most beautiful and spectacular visions of the cosmos by amateur and professional astrophotographers. The winning images are showcased in a stunning exhibition at the Royal Observatory Greenwich. 

Visit the IAPY 2015 exhibition