Queen Elizabeth I

Elizabeth I – the last Tudor monarch – ruled for 45 years and left a long and lasting legacy. Discover more about the voyages of discovery that she supported during her reign and how she helped pave the way for an age of expansion, colonisation and trade.

In December 1559, Queen Elizabeth I consecrated Matthew Parker as the first Archbishop of Canterbury for the new Church of England.

The Tudor dynasty was founded in 1485 by Elizabeth's grandfather, Henry VII, when he emerged victorious after the dynastic Wars of the Roses. 

The success that Queen Elizabeth I reached with the defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1588 was followed by a period of decline. 

Members of the Royal family have been drawn to Greenwich as far back as the late middle ages, with the area being the site of numerous royal births, marriages and deaths.

Early portraits of Queen Elizabeth I stress her God-given right to rule by her death she symbolised national unity.

In December 1587 Queen Elizabeth I put Lord Howard of Effingham in charge of England’s defence against the Spanish Armada.

The threat to the Crown from Catholic forces continued to grow for Queen Elizabeth I during the 1580s.

How was England's defeat of the Spanish Armada under Elizabeth I a defining moment in the country's history?

Walter Raleigh (1544–1618) was a courtier, seaman and explorer in Elizabethan England. He was a pioneer in the English colonisation of North America.

The tides of peace turned for Queen Elizabeth I when Mary, Queen of Scots arrived in England in 1568.