From uniting the kingdoms and the English Civil War, to the hedonism of the 'Merry Monarch' Charles II's court, join us as we delve into the lives and loves of the Stuart monarchs of the 16th and 17th centuries, and examine their impact on British society.

Naval reformer, citizen scientist, serious player on the national stage, MP and prisoner of the Tower of London – Samuel Pepys was all these but it is his candid diary that has ensured he remains a household name centuries after his death.

In 1666 the Great Plague tore through London, wiping out nearly a quarter of its population. See how it spread, who was blamed and how many died in our infographic – packed with surprising facts and figures.

Uncover the salacious side of Stuart London, from the many mistresses of King Charles II to Samuel Pepys's notorious affairs.

Did you know that Samuel Pepys became president of the Royal Society - despite very limited scientific knowledge! How did his love of fish almost stop the publication of Isaac Newton's world-changing Principia Mathematica?

Samuel Pepys, the famous 17th century British diarist, helped to establish the Navy and is often described as ‘the father of the modern Royal Navy’.

There was no full-time navy when James I (VI of Scotland) and Charles I were on the throne. This left the British coastline vulnerable to attack.

Henrietta Maria and Charles I loved to present masques - great spectacles of dance, music, poetry and drama.

Next time you reach for a painkiller, be grateful you weren't relying on Stuart medical treatments.

Get some 17th-century fashion tips - but don't laugh or the make up might crack...

Members of the Royal family have been drawn to Greenwich as far back as the late middle ages, with the area being the site of numerous royal births, marriages and deaths.

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