Museum blog

Read our blog to get the lowdown from our experts and go behind the scenes at Royal Museums Greenwich.

11 July 2018

The ship's wheel is one of the most recognisable parts of Cutty Sark, it is also one of the most photographed items on-board. But its popularity can also be its downfall. 

10 July 2018

Performer and writer Christopher Green is bringing his unique approach to a new interpretation of Elizabeth I inspired by the Armada Portrait in the Queen’s House. Working with a team of expert costume designers and makers led by Bronya Arciszewska and Oliver Cronk, Christopher will explore how the most magnificent image of Tudor royalty is assembled layer by layer. What does it mean to be an icon? And how do you construct one?

5 July 2018

The recent acquisition of Kehinde Wiley’s Ship of Fools has prompted a ‘sea change’ in how visitors can view the subjects and history of the collection housed in the Queen’s House.  

2 July 2018

Heavily contested at the time of its creation, crafted in secrecy and rebellion, the text of this document is now well known the world over.

25 June 2018

The lead paint on this figurehead was once as white as a polar bear's fur. Helen Robertson applied a technique from paper conservation to lighten this 3D object.

25 June 2018

The best of astronomy this month: See the total lunar eclipse and Mars at opposition on 27th July.

25 June 2018

The first modern, research-grade telescopes have just been installed at the Royal Observatory Greenwich, making the institution a working observatory once again after 60 years. Marek Kukula, Brendan Owens and Tom Kerss explain what this will mean for them, researchers, and the public.

22 June 2018

The Caird Library has a new display featuring archive and library items connected with crimes and criminals at sea.

13 June 2018

Traditionally, Jonathan Hulls had often been credited as the first person to conduct practical experiments involving steam-powered vessels. Why then, is his work not remembered?

7 June 2018

Lured by the promise of pink sandy beaches and turquoise-blue seas, millions of tourists visit Bermuda every year. Collaborative Doctoral Student Anna McKay examines the difficulties faced by officials in acquiring labourers to work on the site during the nineteenth century.

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