Learning resources

Curriculum-linked learning resources designed to work in the classroom.

gravity 1.png

In this practical activity, students use F=ma to calculate the acceleration due to gravity and can investigate how the area of a parachute can affect the landing force of a space probe. Accompanies the video ‘Newton’s Laws of Motion’.

Key stage:
Key Stage 4
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

milky_way_hs-2009-28-a-print_1224x420.jpg

A classroom activity in which students use Hubble’s law to derive the age of the Universe and consider the assumptions and sources of error associated with this calculation.

Key stage:
Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

Lost Souls © Julie Fletcher, Astronomy Photographer of the Year People and Space Runner Up 2014

A classroom activity with instructions to accompany the video 'Alien worlds and the Doppler effect'. 

Key stage:
Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

Lost Souls © Julie Fletcher, Astronomy Photographer of the Year People and Space Runner Up 2014

A classroom activity with instructions to accompany the video 'Alien worlds and the Doppler effect'. 

Key stage:
Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

A Tainted Eclipse © Phil Hart, Astronomy Photographer of the Year Our Moon Commended 2015

In this video, Royal Observatory Greenwich astronomer Radmila demonstrates how the Doppler effect can be applied to finding planets orbiting distant stars in our galaxy called exoplanets. She carries out a short demo from which data can be collected and analysed and explains how these techniques can be applied to light and the hunt for exoplanets.

Key stage:
Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

A Tainted Eclipse © Phil Hart, Astronomy Photographer of the Year Our Moon Commended 2015

In this video, Royal Observatory Greenwich astronomer Radmila demonstrates how the Doppler effect can be applied to finding planets orbiting distant stars in our galaxy called exoplanets. She carries out a short demo from which data can be collected and analysed and explains how these techniques can be applied to light and the hunt for exoplanets.

Key stage:
Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

are there aliens

Life began on the Earth around 3.5 billion years ago. Could life have evolved on other planets and if so where are they? Astronomers at the Royal Observatory Greenwich explain how we might detect them in this video.

Key stage:
Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

are there aliens

Life began on the Earth around 3.5 billion years ago. Could life have evolved on other planets and if so where are they? Astronomers at the Royal Observatory Greenwich explain how we might detect them in this video.

Key stage:
Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

are there aliens

Life began on the Earth around 3.5 billion years ago. Could life have evolved on other planets and if so where are they? Astronomers at the Royal Observatory Greenwich explain how we might detect them in this video.

Key stage:
Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

sunshine credit NASA SDO.jpg

In this activity students use E = mc2 to calculate the amount of energy released from nuclear fusion reactions in the Sun. Accompanies the video 'How do we know how old the Sun is?'.

Key stage:
Key Stage 4
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

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