Museum blog

Coronavirus reopening

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Read our blog to get the lowdown from our experts and go behind the scenes at Royal Museums Greenwich.

Illustration to Falconer's Shipwreck.jpg

4 July 2019

Are you interested in family or local history? Do you like visiting churches or are you interested in the lives and deaths of seafarers? Explore our Maritime Memorials database.

The funeral ceremony of Nelson in St. Paul’s Cathedral at the moment when Sir Isaac Heard, Garter Principal King at Arms, gave his oration

12 June 2019

In this blog we recall how the nation bid farewell to Nelson and look at the life of the Garter King of Arms, Sir Isaac Heard (1730-1822), who organized the procession and ceremony.

Captain Markham's most northerly encampment (BHC0640)

28 May 2019

The Caird Library holds many stories from those who made journeys to the poles. 

Tenacious women in the kingdom of letters-primary-image.jpg

24 May 2019

The turn of the eighteenth century may appear an odd place for polite letters of women to be of much significance to the Royal Navy. Along with the eruption of revolutionary violence in France, the spectre of Napoleon cast a shadow over Europe.Yet, in the early 1800s, the correspondence between mothers and wives to John Markham, on the Admiralty Board, reveals the surprising role these women played in attempting to secure their family’s survival.

In the condemned cell - ILN 22/03/1873

13 May 2019

Stories of crimes and their perpetuators seem to have had a renaissance in the public consciousness over the last few years. However, this societal fascination in sensational malefactors can be observed far earlier. Indeed, several instances of this can be found within the Caird Library’s rare book collection, including several editions of the Ordinary of Newgate’s Accounts

The Triumph of Britannia

26 April 2019
By Katherine Gazzard, Collaborative Doctoral Partnership student with RMG, National Portrait Gallery and University of East Anglia.   

HMS Hood ca.1928

24 April 2019

An interesting item from MSS/84/047, a midshipman’s journal kept by Lieutenant Peter Reginald George Worth DSC, RN, from his time aboard HMS Hood, prior to the outbreak of war in 1939.

Annie Scott Dill Maunder (née Russell) by Lafayette 1931 © National Portrait Gallery, London (tile).jpg

13 April 2019

Working in astronomy has always been a challenge for women but somehow they’ve managed to contribute in their own way, whether it’s observing directly themselves or recording and analysing data from other astronomers. Others contributed by writing popular books and developing education materials to share the subject with others. Their work has long been overshadowed by their male counterparts but in this blog I’d like to focus on one particular female astronomer who worked here at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, during the 1890s and whose story really encapsulates the struggles faced by women in astronomy at the time.

Lieutenant's logs

10 April 2019

Here in the Caird Library and Archive we are often asked about Royal Naval records relating either to specific individuals, events or ships. Most of the surviving records generated by the Navy during its long history are held by the National Archives at Kew. One set of records we hold on deposit here at Greenwich however are logs written by Royal Naval Lieutenants during the period of 1673-1809.

Title page of The Bogus Surveyor

3 April 2019

“If, by repeated efforts, you find the index [of the theodolite] will not return to zero after taking a round of angles…unscrew the instrument from its tripod and replace it in the box, close the lid firmly, then gently roll the box one hundred yards or so down the hill side…”  

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