Admiral Lord Nelson

Explore the life and career of Horatio Nelson – from his successful naval career, culminating in the Battle of Trafalgar, to his personal relationships and colourful love life. You can also discover some of the weird and wonderful Nelson-related objects on display at the National Maritime Museum, including the jacket Nelson was wearing when he was fatally wounded.

Nelson timeline

29 September 1758 | Born in Norfolk

11 March 1787 | Married Frances (Fanny) Nisbet

May 1794 | Blinded in his right eye in Bastia

24 July 1797 | Lost his arm at the Battle of Santa Cruz de Tenerife

1799 | Nelson and Emma Hamilton begin their affair

5 February 1801 | Horatia Nelson born, daughter of Nelson and his mistress Emma Hamilton

21 October 1805 | Died at the Battle of Trafalgar

23 December 1805 | Nelson's body brought to Greenwich befor being laid to rest at St. Paul's Cathedral on 8 January. 

 

Buonaparte hearing of Nelson's Victory swears by his Sword to Extirpate the English from off the Earth PW3964_slider.JPG

The lives and careers of Horatio Nelson and Napoleon Bonaparte are inextricably linked, as two dominant leaders and adversaries. 

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We're busy getting ready for the opening of our major Emma Hamilton: Seduction and Celebrity exhibition on 3 November. Paintings Conservator, Sarah Maisey, has been preparing one mysterious portrait for display. We go behind the scenes of her work. 

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Portsmouth is a major British naval base. Nelson left from Portsmouth on board HMS Victory to go to the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805.

Mr Frederick Heintzig, landsman, to Nelson, on board the Foudroyante, 19 July 1799 (CRK/6/156)

Many of the common seamen of Nelson’s time were not literate, meaning letters of the ‘Lower deck’ are rare. Nelson probably received a great deal of correspondence asking for help or influence of one kind or another, but was his reputation for benevolence towards those that had served under him sometimes exploited or taken advantage of? 

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Lord Nelson is best known for his victory at the Battle of the Trafalgar but he was already a national hero before then thanks to his naval tactics.

The funeral ceremony of Nelson in St. Paul’s Cathedral at the moment when Sir Isaac Heard, Garter Principal King at Arms, gave his oration

In this blog we recall how the nation bid farewell to Nelson and look at the life of the Garter King of Arms, Sir Isaac Heard (1730-1822), who organized the procession and ceremony.

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As well as being a naval hero, Lord Nelson was an interesting and complex man. His letters and diaries reveal much about his character.

Viscount Horatio Nelson (1758-1805), before the Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805_banner.jpg

Lord Nelson and his victory at the Battle of Trafalgar left a long and lasting legacy that’s still commemorated today.

'Funeral Procession of the late Lord Viscount Nelson, from the Admiralty to St Paul's, London, 9th January 1806' PY7328_slider.JPG

Nelson was shot at the Battle of Trafalgar (1805). His body was brought back to England on board HMS Victory and he was buried at St Paul’s Cathedral.

The fall of Nelson, Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805 BHC0552_slider.JPG

Lord Nelson was killed at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. Signal Midshipman John Pollard took credit for killing the Frenchman who did it.

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