Astronomy

Venture into another dimension and discover all about astronomy and the study of celestial objects, such as stars, comets, planets and asteroids. Plus, how you can be captivated by the wonders of the universe at the Peter Harrison Planetarium at Royal Observatory Greenwich. 

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With a telescope we can see billons of miles and travel effortlessly back billions of years in time.

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Why was Greenwich chosen as the home of the Prime Meridian and Greenwich Mean Time, and what do those terms mean?

Everything you need to know to start you on the road to becoming an amateur or professional astronomer.

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What can you see through binoculars or a small telescope of the Solar System?

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Is it a star, is it a planet or is it a plane? A handy guide to identifying that bright object you saw last night.

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The 88 constellations act as a handy map of the skies and a seasonal calendar used from ancient times. But what connects the stars in the same constellation?

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The next transit of Mercury will be on 11 November 2019. Find out what the transit of Mercury is and how often it occurs below.

The telescope has evolved as a key scientific instrument that has changed our perceptions of the world. 

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Polaris is the brightest star in the Ursa Minor constellation, and has been used by sailors for navigating at sea.

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Useful tips from the space experts at the Royal Observatory Greenwich on how to become an astronomer

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