Astronomy

Venture into another dimension and discover all about astronomy and the study of celestial objects, such as stars, comets, planets and asteroids. Plus, how you can be captivated by the wonders of the universe at the Peter Harrison Planetarium at Royal Observatory Greenwich. 

How and, more importantly, why do we measure the brightness of stars?

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As well as being objects of beauty, the astrolabe was the instrument favoured for instruction and observation in celestial astronomy for more than a millennium. We hear more from Christopher Parkin, Museum of the History of Science, University of Oxford.

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The Perseid meteor shower is one of the most dramatic things to see in the night sky between July and August. Find out the best dates to see the spectacular display, as well as where to look and how to photograph it.

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The challenges of measuring everything from a fast-moving, wobbly platform through a haze.

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Handy tables of orbits, mass, rotation periods and tilts for the planets and their moons in the Solar System.

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Louise De Keroualle was a key component in the race to find longitude. 

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Check the dates for every full Moon throughout the year, and learn about lunar phases, 'supermoons' and more below.

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With a telescope we can see billons of miles and travel effortlessly back billions of years in time.

The Hubble Space Telescope as seen from the departing Space Shuttle Atlantis, flying STS-125, HST Servicing Mission 4.

Since its 1990 launch, Hubble Space Telescope has been dazzling the world with images of space and a deeper understanding of how the universe works.

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Why was Greenwich chosen as the home of the Prime Meridian and Greenwich Mean Time, and what do those terms mean?

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