Curriculum-linked learning resources designed to work in the classroom.

Life began on the Earth around 3.5 billion years ago. Could life have evolved on other planets and if so where are they? Astronomers at the Royal Observatory Greenwich explain how we might detect them in this video.

Key stage:
Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

Celestia is a spaceflight simulator that allows you to explore real astronomical data as you fly through space.

Key stage:
Key Stage 3
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

A drawing activity in which students visualise the elliptical orbits of the planets and, optionally, study their geometry using basic algebra.

Key stage:
Key Stage 3
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

A classroom activity in which students learn about the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces and how they are considered when designing a space probe to land safely on another planet or moon. Accompanies the video ‘Newton’s Laws of Motion’.

Key stage:
Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

Royal Observatory astronomer Liz shows us the expanding nature of the Universe and how this affects the light reaching us from distant galaxies, some of which will remain forever hidden from our view.

Key stage:
Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

Our Universe began 13.8 billion years ago and it has been expanding ever since. Is it destined to expand forever or will it suffer a more crushing end? Astronomers at the Royal Observatory Greenwich explain the fate of the Universe in this video.

Key stage:
Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

A classroom activity where students use distance, speed and time and light-years to calculate the time of travel to exoplanets. This accompanies the video 'Are there aliens?'

Key stage:
Key Stage 3
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

In this activity students look at the relationship between mass and weight on the Earth and on a comet. Accompanies the video 'The Rosetta Mission'.

Key stage:
Key Stage 3
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

A classroom activity to accompany the video 'Looking for Jupiter', using Stellarium software.

Key stage:
Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

In this video, Royal Observatory Greenwich astronomers Radmila and Brendan use a free computer program called Stellarium to find out where the planet Jupiter is in the night sky. They show how you can take a picture of it using a smartphone camera, what you can see through large binoculars and what details a large telescope can reveal. 

Key stage:
Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

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