Museums, Collections and Conflict, 1500-2010

Coronavirus

Visitor notice: We are pleased to announce that Royal Museums Greenwich is reopening. To find out more about which sites will be open and how to plan your visit, click here.

Essential information

Date and time: 
Friday and Saturday, 13-14 July | All Day
Price: 
MGHG members: £40 | Non-members: £70 | MGHG student members: £25 | Student non-members: £40
Location: 
National Maritime Museum
Season: 
Talks & courses

Join us for a two-day conference hosted at the National Maritime Museum by the Museums and Galleries History Group. 

Museums have been profoundly shaped by war and armed conflict, and have also played a significant part in shaping understandings and memories about them. Yet there has been little sustained examination of the way museums in war and war in museums has played out. Since Gaynor Kavanagh’s foundational study Museums and the First World War in 1994, and with the publication this year of Catherine Pearson’s similarly ground-breaking Museums in the Second World War, it is clear that museums have played and can play an important role in helping society address such crisis situations. On the home front, for example, museums have helped society prepare for war and armed conflict. In leading commemoration in the aftermath of war and armed conflict, museums have helped society come to terms with what happened, understand why it happened, and remember sacrifices. Yet museums have equally served as arenas where issues such as commemoration have been contested and negotiated, and where particular narratives legitimising war and conflict have been developed. This conference hopes to address a broad range of questions, including on collecting (in) war and armed conflict, on the deliberate targeting and destruction or safeguarding of museums and cultural property, and the broader range of institutions brought forth or which are strongly influenced by war and armed conflict.

For the provisional programme and to book tickets, please visit the Museums and Galleries History Group webpage