Curator favourites - great art at the Queen's House

Queen's House Closure

Visitor notice: The Queen's House will be closed to the public from Monday 27 January until Wednesday 12 February, in order to prepare the House for our new exhibitions Faces of a Queen and Woburn Treasures. We apologise for the inconvenience. To hear more about the artworks coming to the Queen's House in 2020, sign up to our newsletter.

Discover some of our famous and less well-known art treasures from the last 400 years in the elegant surroundings of the Queen's House, as selected by our art curators.

Follow the trail

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Painted by much-loved English artist L.S. Lowry in 1959, Deptford Power Station is shown with its chimneys belching black smoke into a pale sky. 

Greenwich Hospital from the North Bank of the Thames
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The work of the renowned 18th-century Italian artist Canaletto, this beautiful painting of Greenwich Hospital and the Queen’s House may have been commissioned by British Consul Joseph Smith for his residence on the Venice Grand Canal, where he entertained many English Grand Tourists.

Image of the Armada Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I
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The iconic Armada portrait of Elizabeth I commemorates the most famous conflict of her reign – the failed invasion of England by the Spanish Armada in summer 1588.

The Parting Cheer
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Partly in shadow, a group of emigrants look out from the deck of a vessel, some waving handkerchiefs, but otherwise passive participants. An increasing stretch of water to the right emphasises their separation from their distraught loved ones on the quay.

Working Boats from around the British Coast
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This quirky and imaginative mural of five panels was originally made for the decoration of the Nelson Bar aboard HMS Campania.

Image of Ship of Fools © Kehinde Wiley
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Ship of Fools is a large oil painting that depicts a group of four migrants in a rickety boat with a tree trunk growing where the mast would be. Like many of the artist’s other works, Ship of Fools responds to an old master painting: in this case, Hieronymus Bosch’s panel of the same name in the collection of the Louvre.