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Browse over 100 amazing attractions at Royal Museums Greenwich, including Nelson's Trafalgar coat, John Harrison's famous timepieces and Turner's largest painting.

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This famous image by Wright of Derby encapsulates how astronomy - studying the stars - became a social activity in the 18th century.

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This fanciful print sets the stage for sociable star gazing. Well-dressed gentlemen and ladies converse in a fashionable garden, complete with classical ruins. They use a number of astronomical instruments – an armillary sphere, telescope and globe.

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Stand beneath the ornate ceiling of the Queen's Presence Chamber and discover an artwork fit for royalty.

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This exquisite globe shows the hero Hercules supporting the starry celestial sphere on his shoulders.

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James Clark Ross was one of the great polar explorers, a star of his day who used the Pole Star to discover the North Pole. 

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The Queen's House is home to a rich collection of contemporary artwork on free display. These artists have responded to contemporary concerns of nationhood, migration, tradition, and life at sea in their own unique and diverse ways.

“Drawing on Space”, by American artist Michelle Stuart

‘Drawing on Space’ forms part of Michelle Stuart’s recent body of work, in which she arranges astronomy-themed photographs in a grid, lending a narrative character to her poetic pieces.

Richard Wright's Great Hall ceiling

Stand within the perfect cube of the Great Hall and revel in Turner Prize-winning artist Richard Wright's intricate and unique design for its ceiling.

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Wearing gold armour and jewelled sandals with lion-mask tops, James, Duke of York is depicted in the ostentatious tradition of the swagger portrait.

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Helman’s print after a painting by Le Prince shows the extent to which star gazing could become impolite and risqué in the 18th century. Although an activity encouraged between men and women, it also offered the possibility for intrigue after dark.

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