The highly commended images for the Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2010 competition.

This is the Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition category for under-16s.

The Moon is a wonderful object to photograph if you’re just starting out in astrophotography, with constant changes of view throughout the lunar cycle. Find out more about How to photograph the Moon

The easiest way to capture star trails, another popular category with our young astrophotographers, is to take one long exposure, of at least 30 minutes. Find out more about How to photograph star trails

Highly commended: Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2010

There were three highly commended Young Astronomy Photographer images:

‘Half-Moon Terminator’ by 14-year-old Jathin Premjith (India),  captures the lunar landscape littered with craters formed by the impact of asteroids and comets over billions of years. They are easiest to see close to the terminator, the boundary between the sunlit and dark sides of the Moon.

‘A Detailed Full Moon’ by 15-year-old Daniel Mortimer (UK) was another image of the Moon. The dark areas on the Moon’s surface are vast plains of solidified lava called lunar ‘seas’ or maria. The ‘rays’ toward the lower portion of this image are the spray of debris from an ancient crater, formed billions of years ago by the impact of a large asteroid or comet.

‘The Pelican Nebula Up-Close’ by Elias Jordan (USA), also aged 15, was taken during an astronomy vacation in New Mexico.  The Pelican Nebula is part of a huge cloud of gas and dust in which new stars are forming. Hydrogen gas heated by young stars glows pink, while dense clouds of dust stand out dark against the lighter background.

Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition

The Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition is an annual global search for the most beautiful and spectacular visions of the cosmos by amateur and professional astrophotographers. The winning images are showcased in a stunning exhibition at the Royal Observatory Greenwich.

Visit the IAPY 2015 exhibition