The winning image for the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2016 Young competition.

The Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year Young Competition is for budding young astronomy photographers aged 15 or under. All winners are featured in our annual competition book and showcased in an exhibition at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich. The Young competition winner is also eligible to win the main Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition.

Winner of the IAPY 2016 Young Competition

The winner of the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2016 Young Competition is 'Lunar Reversal' by Brendan Devine (USA), aged 15, taken at Chicago, Illinois, USA on 21 November 2015, using a Canon 7D Mark II camera with Canon EF 100–400 mm f/4.5–5.6L IS II USM lens at 400 mm f/8, with Manfrotto tripod, at ISO 640 with 62 x 1/800-second exposures.

What the photographer says

‘On a clear night last November, I set up my camera on my front lawn. I honed in on the focus until the Moon appeared perfectly sharp. I put my camera into continuous firing mode and shot 70 frames in seven seconds. Taking the best 62 frames, I aligned and stacked them, then adjusted the wavelets to sharpen the image. I made the decision to invert the image to give it an extra ‘pop’. What I really like about my lunar photograph is how it shows detail that many people normally find difficult to see, and it helps to highlight the complexity and beauty of the lunar surface.’ Brendan Devine

What the judges say

‘Artistic and technical experimentation is wonderful to see in images from both young, and more experienced, astronomy photographers. A bold moon and great to see it reversed.’ Ed Robinson

Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition

The Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition, sponsored by Insight Investment, is an annual global search for the most beautiful and spectacular visions of the cosmos by amateur and professional astrophotographers. The winning images are showcased in a stunning exhibition at the Royal Observatory Greenwich. 

Visit the exhibition