Whether it's observing the stars, standing astride the Prime Meridian or marvelling at John Harrison's timepieces, the Royal Observatory Greenwich provides a treasure trove of fascinating information. Read all about the history of space, time and navigation, plus find out more about the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition.

George Biddell Airy was Astronomer Royal for much of the 19th century and he amassed a treasure trove of data.

The Great Equatorial Telescope at the Royal Observatory kept Britain at the forefront of astrophysics and greatly expanded our knowledge of stars.

The story of Astronomer Royal George Biddell Airy and the remarkable Airy Transit Circle telescope he designed at the Royal Observatory Greenwich.

19th-century astronomers went beyond cataloguing the skies to understanding their composition and predicting what could not be seen.

Meridian astronomy is the meticulous surveying of the stars so that positions and movements of stars can be known accurately.

How and, more importantly, why do we measure the brightness of stars?

The challenges of measuring everything from a fast-moving, wobbly platform through a haze.

With a telescope we can see billons of miles and travel effortlessly back billions of years in time.

Why was Greenwich chosen as the home of the Prime Meridian and Greenwich Mean Time, and what do those terms mean?

Science and secret missions in the South Seas; innovations, discoveries and derring do. Cook’s first great voyage quickly became the stuff of legend.

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