The winning image for the Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2010 competition.

This is the Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition category for under-16s.

The Moon is a wonderful object to photograph if you’re just starting out in astrophotography, with constant changes of view throughout the lunar cycle. Find out more about How to photograph the Moon

The easiest way to capture star trails, another popular category with our young astrophotographers, is to take one long exposure, of at least 30 minutes. Find out more about How to photograph star trails

Winner: Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2010

The winning shot for the Young Astronomy Photographer category for 2010 was ‘A Perfect Circle’ by 14-year-old Dhruv Arvind Paranjpye (India), captured using a Nikon E3700 digital camera. The image is of an annular eclipse, which occurs when the Moon is too far from the Earth to completely cover the Sun’s disc, as it would during a total solar eclipse. 

Judge Rebekah Higgitt said of the photo: ‘I loved how the perfect geometry of the eclipsed Sun contrasts with the chaotic shapes of the clouds. By using the clouds as a filter, Paranjpye has been able to reproduce wonderful, contrasting colours.’

Note that specialist equipment is needed to safely observe or photograph the Sun. Looking at the Sun with the naked eye or through a telescope, binoculars or camera can cause injury or permanent blindness.

Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition

The Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition is an annual global search for the most beautiful and spectacular visions of the cosmos by amateur and professional astrophotographers. The winning images are showcased in a stunning exhibition at the Royal Observatory Greenwich. 

Visit the IAPY 2015 exhibition