Learning resources

Curriculum-linked learning resources designed to work in the classroom.

Hubble's Law

Students look at the relationship between velocity and distance of a galaxy and what that means for the Universe. Accompanies the video 'How big is the Universe'.

Key stage:
Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

looking for jupiter

In this video, Royal Observatory Greenwich astronomers Radmila and Brendan use a free computer program called Stellarium to find out where the planet Jupiter is in the night sky. They show how you can take a picture of it using a smartphone camera, what you can see through large binoculars and what details a large telescope can reveal. 

Key stage:
Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

Star Trails, Blue Mountains © Ted Dobosz, Astronomy Photographer of the Year Earth and Space Winner 2009

Activity with instructions to accompany the video 'Making star trails'. 

Key stage:
Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

Veil Nebula © Martin Pugh, Astronomy Photographer of the Year Deep Space Runner Up 2010

Students use the Doppler equation and angular momentum to calculate the mass of an orbiting extrasolar planet. Accompanies the video 'Alien worlds and the Doppler effect'.

Key stage:
Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

measuring the universe

This video explains how we can measure the distance to near and far objects in the universe using parallax, 'standard candles' and the Doppler effect.

Key stage:
Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

Nuclear Fusion in Stars

Key stage:
Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

Comet-Lovejoy-1024x614.jpg

Students calculate the age of a meteorite by looking at the half life of one of its elements - rubidium. Accompanies the video 'How do we know how old the Sun is?'.

Key stage:
Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

Sunspot_TRACE.jpeg

A classroom activity in which students learn how the rotation of the Sun can be measured through Doppler-shifted emission lines and estimate the errors associated with this measurement.

Key stage:
Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

Sirius 9798 © David Pye, Astronomy Photographer of the Year Stars and Nebulae Joint Runner-Up 2015

In this activity students use star trails to calculate the true rotation period of the Earth. Students can make their own star trails inside the classroom - watch the video 'Making star trails'.

Key stage:
Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

Stars and the H-R Diagram

Key stage:
Key Stage 4, GCSE, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

Pages