New books for December

Coronavirus

Visitor notice: We are pleased to announce that Royal Museums Greenwich is reopening. To find out more about which sites will be open and how to plan your visit, click here.

The library collection is continually growing here at the Caird Library and every month the library team works hard to catalogue new material covering all aspects of the National Maritime Museum's collections. You can see all the material we’ve catalogued in November on the “What’s new?” section of the online catalogue.
This month we've been concentrating on new material relating to the Museum's new permanent gallery "Atlantic Worlds". We've catalogued many new books that explore the main themes of this new gallery such as trade and commerce in "Empires of the Atlantic world: Britain and Spain in America, 1492-1830" by J.H. Elliott, exploration and cultural encounters in "Transatlantic encounters: American Indians in Britain, 1500-1776" by Alden T. Vaughan, and enslavement and resistance in "Slavery, colonialism and connoisseurship: gender and eighteenth-century literary transnationalism" by Nandini Bhattacharya.
In our art section we've catalogued two new books examining the lives of two artists whose work we hold here at the National Maritime Museum "Leslie A Wilcox" and "William Hogarth". While
"Sundials at Greenwich : a catalogue of the sundials, nocturnals and horay quadrants in the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich" by Hester Higton offers a fascinating insight to our unique horology collection in the Royal Observatory.
Finally, we've added two new series of children's books to the E-Library. Annie O'Dowd's “A seadog adventure” series of picture books follows the adventures of the Sandburrow family from the seaside village of Foamy Bay. And in the non-fiction section children can learn about “The real world of pirates” in Allison Lassiuer's series of books.
Be sure to check back next month to find out more about the next batch of new books we catalogue. There's a six volume collection of the scientific correspondence of Joseph Banks that looks particularly intriguing...
Gary (Assistant Librarian)