Learning resources

Curriculum-linked learning resources designed to work in the classroom.

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A classroom activity in which students use Hubble’s law to derive the age of the Universe and consider the assumptions and sources of error associated with this calculation.

Key stage:
Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

Lost Souls © Julie Fletcher, Astronomy Photographer of the Year People and Space Runner Up 2014

A classroom activity with instructions to accompany the video 'Alien worlds and the Doppler effect'. 

Key stage:
Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

A Tainted Eclipse © Phil Hart, Astronomy Photographer of the Year Our Moon Commended 2015

In this video, Royal Observatory Greenwich astronomer Radmila demonstrates how the Doppler effect can be applied to finding planets orbiting distant stars in our galaxy called exoplanets. She carries out a short demo from which data can be collected and analysed and explains how these techniques can be applied to light and the hunt for exoplanets.

Key stage:
Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

are there aliens

Life began on the Earth around 3.5 billion years ago. Could life have evolved on other planets and if so where are they? Astronomers at the Royal Observatory Greenwich explain how we might detect them in this video.

Key stage:
Key Stage 2, Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2012_Overall and Deep Space winner_M51 The Whirlpool Galaxy by Martin Pugh_UK/Australia_banner.JPG

Students calculate the Schwarzschild radius of a black hole with the same mass as the Earth and one with the mass of the Milky Way. Accompanies the video 'What's inside a black hole?'

Key stage:
Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

Calculating where Space begins

In this classroom activity students use real data with the physics of forces and circular motion to calculate the altitude at which space begins.

Key stage:
Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

Collisions and explosions in the universe - banner.png

On the smallest to the largest scales, collisions and explosions happen all over our Universe.

Key stage:
Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

The Lost Hour Andrew Whyte.jpg

Students use the Doppler formula to calculate the redshift of a distant galaxy and the size of the Universe when light first left the galaxy. Accompanies the video 'How big is the Universe?'

Key stage:
Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Maths, Science

how big is the universe

Royal Observatory astronomer Liz shows us the expanding nature of the Universe and how this affects the light reaching us from distant galaxies, some of which will remain forever hidden from our view.

Key stage:
Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

how do we know how old the sun is

ROG astronomer Brendan explains how we determine the age of our Solar System from space rocks and how we can work out how long the Sun has left before it engulfs the inner planets.

Key stage:
Key Stage 4, Post-16
School subject:
Astronomy, Science

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