Live panel discussion | Windrush Day 2020

Essential information

Date and time: 
22 June | 6.30pm
Admission: 
Free
Location: 
Online

Join us for two live panel discussions online on Windrush Day

Before Windrush: Commercial travel and migration before 1948

6pm | Reserve a ticket

A panel discussion that dispels the myth that immigration in Britain from the Caribbean "began" in 1948.

Why has the HMT Empire Windrush become such an iconic symbol and does this lead to a misunderstanding of migrant histories in Britain?

Featuring historian S.I. Martin and historian and archivist Kelly Foster.

S.I. Martin 

Specialising in the fields of Black British history and literature, I work with museums, archives and the education sector to bring diverse histories to wider audiences. I have published five books of historical fiction and non-fiction for adult and teenage readers. 

I founded the 500 Years of Black London walks nearly 20 years ago in response to the low profile given to the Black historical presence on the capital's streets. I have consistently encouraged and championed the provision of plaques, street names and street furniture to this end. 

Kelly Foster 

I am an open knowledge advocate and public historian,  working both online and "on road" as London Blue Badge Guide. I am the chapter lead for Creative Commons UK and founding organiser of AfroCROWD UK, an initiative to encourage more people of African heritage to contribute to Wikipedia and it’s sister projects. I have over 15 years of experience in the UK's community archives sector and am a founding member of TRANSMISSION, a collective of archivists and historians of African descent.

HMT Empire Windrush and British nationality laws

Postponed 

A former Second World War German troopship won as a prize of war by the British, the passengers aboard the HMT Empire Windrush on 22 June 1948 encapsulated the British Empire's changing relationship with it's commonwealth citizens.

This panel discussion will delve into the legislative changes made from 1948 to today on who can call themselves a British citizen.