Royal Observatory Greenwich

Whether it's observing the stars, standing astride the Prime Meridian or marvelling at John Harrison's timepieces, the Royal Observatory Greenwich provides a treasure trove of fascinating information. Read all about the history of space, time and navigation, plus find out more about the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition.

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In September 2019, for the first time in over 360 years, compasses at Greenwich pointed true north. But what does this mean - and haven't compasses always pointed 'north'? 

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The Great Equatorial Telescope at the Royal Observatory kept Britain at the forefront of astrophysics and greatly expanded our knowledge of stars.

Cecilia Payne Gaposchkin

Einstein, Newton and Galileo are names we have heard numerous times. But who are the women who have changed the world of science, and why don’t we know their names too?

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The story of Astronomer Royal George Biddell Airy and the remarkable Airy Transit Circle telescope he designed at the Royal Observatory Greenwich.

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19th-century astronomers went beyond cataloguing the skies to understanding their composition and predicting what could not be seen.

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Meridian astronomy is the meticulous surveying of the stars so that positions and movements of stars can be known accurately.

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With a telescope we can see billons of miles and travel effortlessly back billions of years in time.

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Why was Greenwich chosen as the home of the Prime Meridian and Greenwich Mean Time, and what do those terms mean?

Hunting Moon © Jean Baptise Feldmann, Astronomy Photographer of the Year People and Space Runner Up 2011

Is it a star, is it a planet or is it a plane? A handy guide to identifying that bright object you saw last night.

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The 88 constellations act as a handy map of the skies and a seasonal calendar used from ancient times. But what connects the stars in the same constellation?

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