Royal Observatory Greenwich

Whether it's observing the stars, standing astride the Prime Meridian or marvelling at John Harrison's timepieces, the Royal Observatory Greenwich provides a treasure trove of fascinating information. Read all about the history of space, time and navigation, plus find out more about the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition.

Hunting Moon © Jean Baptise Feldmann, Astronomy Photographer of the Year People and Space Runner Up 2011

Is it a star, is it a planet or is it a plane? A handy guide to identifying that bright object you saw last night.

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The 88 constellations act as a handy map of the skies and a seasonal calendar used from ancient times. But what connects the stars in the same constellation?

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In August 2015 a paper was published by scientists in the US explaining why the Prime Meridian at the Royal Observatory Greenwich is 102 metres to the west of the prime meridian used by satellite based navigation and timekeeping, known as the International Reference Meridian or IRM. The paper created quite a stir in the media.

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Find out more about how the Royal Observatory was founded, and its fascinating role in British history.

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Discover the story of the founding of our Observatory, Britain's first state-funded scientific research institution.

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